Updated: Feb 20, 2019


Tips to stay safe during snowmobile season

If you live or vacation where the weather gets cold and the snow starts falling, some people are content to cozy up next to the fire with a good book and concentrate on staying warm.


For others, though, it’s time to get excited — because it’s time to break out the

snowmobiles and head to the nearest winter recreation spot. It’s a popular activity, and for good reason: Snowmobiling allows you to explore natural areas that may be hard to access by foot (or snowshoe), and provides a different kind of excitement than skiing or hiking.

Of course, snowmobiling presents some dangers as well. And here at Weaver Insurance Agency, we want you to make it home safely after your day in the snow. Read on for safety tips from the American Council of Snowmobile Associations — and keep in mind that following these will not only help you stay safe, but also influence equitable treatment of snowmobile access by government, agencies and landowners.

SPEED: Speed is a major factor in many snowmobile crashes. Always keep your speed slow enough to ensure that you’re in control.

ALCOHOL: Use of alcohol or any other drug that causes impairment is a leading cause of snowmobile-related fatalities. It’s best to refrain from any use at all before and during outings because of potential effects on vision, reaction time, balance and coordination. When combined with excess speed in particular, the results can be deadly.

AVALANCHE: More than 90 percent of the time, avalanches that involve people are triggered by the victims. Learn to follow avalanche safety procedures and always know the risks at all times.

RIDING AT NIGHT: Nighttime snowmobiling is fun, but extra caution should be used. Ride at slower speeds so as not to override your headlights (which generally illuminate your path for about 200 feet). Faster speeds could mean that you have little or no time to react to an obstacle in your path.

ROADWAYS: Always keep an eye out for vehicles, as many trails are located alongside roadways and can cross over them. Be sure to stop fully at all stop signs and unmarked road crossings.

CLOSED AREAS: Areas may be closed to snowmobiles due to hazardous conditions, wintering wildlife, non-motorized recreation or by landowner request. It’s important to honor these closures for safety purposes and to help protect access to other riding areas.

While it’s extremely important to follow these tips for your personal safety, it’s also vital to encourage others to snowmobile safely as well. Helping to educate others will not only promote safety for all snowmobilers, but also protect the sport’s image as well.

Whether you’re a new rider or have been on the trails for years, ask yourself if you could be riding more safely. There are many more winters to come, and we want you to be able to enjoy as many of them as possible!


#snowmobile #bighornmountains #redlodge #bozeman #tahoe #antelopebutte #sibleylake #cutler #nordic


Finally, we’re welcoming winter, that eagerly anticipated season when we get to enjoy much cooler temps, cozy sweaters and of course, the core of football season in Wyoming!


Football season in Wyoming brings with it a whole host of seasonal activities for football fans, from game-day tailgates and sports bar outings, to friendly bets and bowl parties. At Weaver Insurance Agency, we want your football season to be both exciting and safe, so as you cheer your team to victory, consider the following tips.

  • Keep it clean: Tailgating is one of America’s favorite pastimes! If you’re tailgating, opt for non-breakable, recyclable containers. This will make cleanup easier and help avoid injuries resulting from broken glass.

  • Be smart: Whether you are tailgating, hosting a football-watching party at your house in Sheridan, sitting in the stands at University of Wyoming or joining your buddies at the local bar, know your limit on alcohol intake and make sure you have a designated driver.

  • Know where you’re going: Pre-plan travel to and from the stadium to avoid getting lost and to make finding parking easier if you drive.

  • Fill those bellies: Whenever alcohol is consumed, make sure food is too!

  • Be weather wise: If you’re heading to the stadium, be sure to prepare for the weather. In colder temps, bring layers and blankets (especially if you’re bringing the little ones along). Also, avoid umbrellas if you find yourself in a lightning storm.

  • Keep it close: Whether you’re hitting the live game or the local tavern, be sure to keep your valuables, such as wallets, mobile phones and purses, safe. Also, keep it close to you (better yet, attached) at all times to avoid theft.

Wherever and however you’re watching the game this weekend, we hope you enjoy every last minute. Go team!

Game day insurance tips

Here are a few pointers for making sure your insurance provides an additional safety net on game day:

• Make sure you have adequate auto coverage to cover any contents that may be stolen in the unfortunate event of a break-in at the stadium parking lot.

• Ensure you have sufficient liability coverage on your homeowner’s policy, as well as medical payments coverage and possibly umbrella coverage. These exist to protect you in the event someone becomes injured while at your house.

• Consider roadside assistance coverage. In the event your vehicle breaks down or you lock your keys in your car, it can save the day.



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You insure your most valuable assets like your home, your car and your life. Most people would agree that they’re worth protection; however, disability income (DI) insurance is something people tend to be less certain about. They’re not sure if they really need it, or if it’s worth the cost. So, is it? There’s no cut-and-dried answer, but there are some strong arguments to be made in favor of DI.

What Are the Chances You’ll Need It?

When you think about the kind of disability that could keep you from working, usually the first thing that comes to mind is a car accident or other catastrophic injury — in other words, something that could happen, but most likely won’t.

In reality, the most common cause of disability is illness, not accidents or injuries. Arthritis, back pain, neurological problems and cardiovascular illnesses are all more common than injuries when it comes to disability claims. And, disabilities are more common than you might think. In fact, one in four 20-year-olds will become disabled before they reach retirement age, according to the Social Security Administration. You probably know someone who’s had to take time off from work for medical reasons, even if it’s not permanent.

Can I Afford It?

When you’re already paying for other kinds of insurance — home, auto, life, etc., — it’s hard to think about buying more. But a good way to frame it is what DI costs vs. what the benefit would be if you used it.

Here’s a hypothetical: Say a 30-year-old man, taking home $56,250 a year buys a disability insurance policy that costs him $929 per year. (By comparison he could be spending $985 a year on a daily coffee, assuming an average price of $2.70.5)

If he becomes totally disabled, after a 90-day waiting period he could receive $4,050 a month over 12 months, replacing about 86 percent of his pre-disability, after-tax income — and hopefully allowing him to keep up his coffee habit.

There are, of course, some limitations and eligibility requirements for DI. So in the end, it’s a matter of whether you feel like the benefit you could receive outweighs the cost of premiums and the uncertainty that comes with not having any coverage at all. Costs and benefits vary from policy to policy.

Protecting Your Most Valuable Asset

With any luck, you’ll never have to deal with a disability that keeps you from being able to work. But it’s a good idea to have a plan in place, so that if you ever did become disabled you could still cover your expenses and provide for the people who count on you.

Give Jim a call today to start discussing your options for paycheck protection!

Jim's focus: Insurance Strategies, Business Owners, Military,
Group Benefits & Business Succession Planning


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